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TDEE calculator to lose weight

TDEE Calculator

Content written by Sajid khan (MBBS (KMC),FCPS) 

Researched from NHS, NIDDK and  National institute of aging

Reviewed by Junaid khan (MS Nutrition)

Coding and design by Marcelino

Fact checked 🔍✓

Published: October 18, 2023 → Last Updated: January 29, 2024

Welcome to the TDEE Calculator to balance you diet! This specialized tool is designed to help you estimate your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) and create a targeted caloric deficit for effective weight loss or gain and maintain a good healthy life. Understanding your TDEE is a crucial step in developing a successful weight loss strategy.

By inputting your age, gender, height, weight, and activity level, this calculator will compute your TDEE. Leveraging this information, you can determine the ideal caloric intake to create a sustainable caloric intake, aiding in your healthy life.

Efficient, accurate, and tailored for for balance diet for every person with any age — this TDEE Calculator is a valuable asset. Happy calculating and best of luck on your balance diet and weight loss or weight gain journey!

What is TDEE?

TDEE stands for Total Daily Energy Expenditure. It represents the total number of calories a person burns in a day, taking into account their basal metabolic rate (BMR) and physical activity. TDEE considers the energy your body needs to maintain basic functions at rest (BMR) and the calories you burn through activities and exercise. It’s an important concept for understanding how many calories you should consume to maintain, gain, or lose weight based on your daily energy needs.

How to calculate daily energy expenditure?

The equation commonly used to estimate Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) is based on the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and an activity multiplier. Two popular equations for estimating TDEE are the Mifflin-St Jeor Equation and the Harris-Benedict Equation.

  1. Mifflin-St Jeor Equation:

    • For men: TDEE = (10 x weight in kg) + (6.25 x height in cm) – (5 x age in years) + 5
    • For women: TDEE = (10 x weight in kg) + (6.25 x height in cm) – (5 x age in years) – 161
  2. Harris-Benedict Equation (Revised Harris-Benedict Equation):

    • For men: TDEE = (88.362 + (13.397 x weight in kg) + (4.799 x height in cm) – (5.677 x age in years)) x activity multiplier
    • For women: TDEE = (447.593 + (9.247 x weight in kg) + (3.098 x height in cm) – (4.330 x age in years)) x activity multiplier

These equations provide estimates of your TDEE, which includes the calories you need to maintain your current weight, taking into account your activity level. You can choose an appropriate activity multiplier based on how active you are, as mentioned in a previous response.

Relation between TDEE and BMI

Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE) and Body Mass Index (BMI) are two different concepts related to health and fitness, and they are not directly dependent on each other. However, there is an indirect relationship between TDEE and BMI in the context of managing one’s weight and overall health. checkout BMI calculator 

  1. TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure):

    • TDEE represents the total number of calories your body expends in a day, taking into account various factors such as your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), physical activity level, and thermic effect of food.
    • It is a measure of the energy you need to maintain your current weight.
  2. BMI (Body Mass Index):

    • BMI is a straightforward numerical measurement derived from your weight and height. It is used to categorize individuals into different weight classes, such as underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese.
    • It is a measure of your body composition and doesn’t take into account your overall energy expenditure.

The indirect relationship between TDEE and BMI is as follows:

  • If your TDEE is greater than your caloric intake, you will typically lose weight. This creates a calorie deficit, and over time, you may reduce your body weight and subsequently lower your BMI.
  • Conversely, if your TDEE is less than your caloric intake, you will generally gain weight, which can lead to an increase in your BMI.
  • To maintain your current BMI, you would need to balance your caloric intake with your TDEE.

It’s important to note that while there is a connection between TDEE and BMI in the context of weight management, BMI has limitations. It doesn’t take into account factors like muscle mass, body composition, and distribution of fat, so it may not provide a complete picture of an individual’s health. Other health markers, such as body fat percentage and overall fitness, should also be considered in conjunction with BMI to assess one’s health comprehensively.

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